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Author Topic:   how do you treat your horses heaves,copd
ceebee
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posted July 20, 2008 11:54 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for ceebee     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
just wanting to know what you use to treat your horses heaves,what you started with what you progressed to ,any suggestions as vets seem to have fairly mixed programs

mare is 9 yrs old easy keeper,no problems till month ago,treated with dex,antihistamine and ? then prelisone for 2 weeks.water hay ,zev on grain and has been fine,lunging everyday,is in at night currently as she has a foal but barn is open,shes close to the door.If I lunge her before shes been out and hasn't worked the day before she will cough a few times, she will be going back into work in sept when her colt is weaned.Vet that reated her attack says steroids from now to eternity,own vet and and "friend' vet say treat as allergy ,soak hay inside and be prepared to treat if and when it reoccurs,less is more.......

sorry for the long story ,horse is only on lease and would like to return her as she apparently came

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Bobthehorse
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From:Toronto, ON, Canada
Registered: Oct 2007

posted July 21, 2008 10:30 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Bobthehorse     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
It never just "starts". Its a sensitivity that some horse seem to have since their youth. These horses, for some reason, are always more prone to breathing problems than others, and most breathing issues are a very gradual thing. Triggers include dusty bedding, dusty hay, dust in general, mouldy hay, pollen and other allergens.

I feed only hay cubes, soaked. He is on pasture, so no dusty dry lot. He is on outdoor board. He is on Recovery EQ for anti-inflammatory effects, and Airways 101 by McIntosh. Expensive but worth it. The Recovery is also for his joints though, as he is 18. I give him Ventipulmin from 2 days before the show just for a little extra, but its not great to have him on all the time.

I also hear Unimin is a great supplement for heaves, and will try it one of these days.

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debt
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Posts: 122
From:Ottawa, Ontario
Registered: May 2002

posted July 21, 2008 11:16 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for debt     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Hi,
I did the usual Ventipulmin, steroids, antihistamines etc. at the beginning - due to an "episode", then I did allergy testing to find out exactly what it was that my horse had sensitivities to, and I did the allergy shots for about 2 years.
I have since moved him home and he's out 10 hrs a day, only gets hay that I have cut myself (so I know it's not dusty!), and he's off all the meds except for Antihistamine when it's the time of year that he's likely to have a problem (or if I hear him get a bit congested).
My vet checked his breathing at the time I did Spring shots, and said his lungs sounded great!

Phew!

Good luck!

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lostmile
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From:brantford, ontario
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posted July 21, 2008 02:28 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for lostmile     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Two winters ago I did the steroid injections and steamed my guys hay. By some miracle he has been fine ever since. He got through last winter without injectons and eating his hay dry and so far this weather has not bothered him either.

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Grriffin
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posted July 21, 2008 08:40 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Grriffin     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Once past the acute phase with Vet intervention, I make sure all their hay is soaked, that they are out as much as possible. It is going to be the day to day maintenance that keeps them going.

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ceebee
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posted July 22, 2008 12:21 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for ceebee     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
do you reccommend a minimum amount of time on steroids as a starter?has your horses programs changed over time with an increases in work.We have had a few old timers with copd and went the kenalog route with success but seems extreme for a young mare .

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glitterless
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posted July 22, 2008 01:56 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for glitterless     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I would avoid steroids until you absolutely have to. They're not healthy and you should expect some side effects if she's on them long term or if she's getting shots more than once a week or every few days. At least from what I've read.

Corticosteroids really do work for COPD, but I suggest changing her environment first and then only use steroids if she's still coughing or has laboured breathing.

My young gelding had a cough, which we believe was orginally caused by an infection. Then it got worse and worse. I finally took him out of the barn (he was stalled at night), soaked all of his hay, and put him on breathing supplements. The cough did clear up, but it took months before he could eat dry hay again and not cough during light exercise. I think all it takes is some inflammation in the airways/lungs that is prolonged. I think scarring probably occurs, excess mucous is produced, and it's like a vicious cycle that won't stop. Everything will irritate the horse at this point. My vet told me that even 15 mins. in a dusty barn per day can be too much.

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schatzi
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From:canada
Registered: Oct 2002

posted July 22, 2008 08:15 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for schatzi     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
We had a lot of luck with wendalls herbs,Special Respiratory. My clients horse had the worse case of heaves I'd ever seen. When she came into the barn she was getting an aeromask with 10 puffs of flovent every second day and Ventipulmin 2x a day.
so we started her on that with all the regulars soaked hay, pasture etc...
Started her on the herbs and weaned her off the others, she gained weight and tons of energy bucking and kicking when she went out, we actually had to cut her grain back.
I would try a more natural route if you can, I think long term effects from steroids would be more damaging.

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Bobthehorse
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From:Toronto, ON, Canada
Registered: Oct 2007

posted July 22, 2008 11:08 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Bobthehorse     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by glitterless:
I would avoid steroids until you absolutely have to. They're not healthy and you should expect some side effects if she's on them long term or if she's getting shots more than once a week or every few days. At least from what I've read..

I agree, avoid them at all costs. Since heaves is mostly environment based, its really much better for them to just start changing things like hay (to cubes) and feed (no pelleted feed) and other things like that. My dog was on steroids for a few months, and boy was he a different dog. Depressed and anxious and off his food.

This is my second horse with heaves, and still I have never used steroids. The first one was 22 when I got him, and this one is now 18 and still eventing at Training with no problems. Its all about maintenance, not drugs.

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perpetual_novice
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posted July 22, 2008 12:18 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for perpetual_novice     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by glitterless:
I would avoid steroids until you absolutely have to. They're not healthy and you should expect some side effects if she's on them long term or if she's getting shots more than once a week or every few days. At least from what I've read.

Corticosteroids really do work for COPD, but I suggest changing her environment first and then only use steroids if she's still coughing or has laboured breathing.


quote:
Originally posted by Bobthehorse:
I agree, avoid them at all costs. Since heaves is mostly environment based, its really much better for them to just start changing things like hay (to cubes) and feed (no pelleted feed) and other things like that. My dog was on steroids for a few months, and boy was he a different dog. Depressed and anxious and off his food.

This is my second horse with heaves, and still I have never used steroids. The first one was 22 when I got him, and this one is now 18 and still eventing at Training with no problems. Its all about maintenance, not drugs.


My horse is on high doses of steroids for an autoimmune condition (not COPD). I was very concerned about side effects, but was reassured when the vet told me of a case where he was using similarly high levels of the medication to control COPD in another patient. The horse started on the medication when it was 22 and died when it was 28.

Obviously, horse owners will want to try natural remedies and changes in turnout practices first, but there are so many factors that affect COPD it is sometimes difficult to manage the condition without drugs.

Steroids may not be healthy but sometimes you may not have any other option.

[This message has been edited by perpetual_novice (edited July 22, 2008).]

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Bobthehorse
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From:Toronto, ON, Canada
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posted July 22, 2008 08:13 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Bobthehorse     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Yes but they should not be the first thing one tries.

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NorthCountryAcres
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From:Cameron, ON, Canada
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posted July 22, 2008 09:40 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for NorthCountryAcres     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I board retired horses and have 2 with heaves.
Zev and WindAid, are the 2 products I use. I only result to the Zev when they have a tough time, generally in the spring.
All feed is wet down, including their hay. No round bales, outside 24/7 with an outside stall.
One is a 24 year old and the other is 26. Both owners have chosen natural management. Over 2 years, both do well with treatment as needed. Both are hard keepers.
However that said, I think it is the owners choice. I would suggest trying natural products and management depending on how severe your horses symptoms are. I am sure your vet can help you work out an alternative plan.

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glitterless
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posted July 23, 2008 12:01 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for glitterless     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by perpetual_novice:
[b] My horse is on high doses of steroids for an autoimmune condition (not COPD). I was very concerned about side effects, but was reassured when the vet told me of a case where he was using similarly high levels of the medication to control COPD in another patient. The horse started on the medication when it was 22 and died when it was 28.

Obviously, horse owners will want to try natural remedies and changes in turnout practices first, but there are so many factors that affect COPD it is sometimes difficult to manage the condition without drugs.

Steroids may not be healthy but sometimes you may not have any other option.

[This message has been edited by perpetual_novice (edited July 22, 2008).]


I totally agree with you, but do some reading on the long term side effects of prednisolone (one of the common corticosteroids used to treat COPD) and you may change your mind. We had a discussion on EMG before about corticosteroid use and some posters had actually used prednisone themselves and had horrible side effects. Different animals react to medication differently. Some of them are fine, but some of them have serious complications, like a compromised immune system which can lead to premature death. Corticosteroids can also cause laminitis at high doses.

My mare is on Predef 2X and has been for a few years. At first she was getting a shot every couple of days, but with better management, we've got her down to 1 shot per week in the spring/summer/fall and no shots at all over the winter. She's older (early-mid 20s) and has other soundness issues, so we're just worried about keeping her pasture sound at this point, and so far so good. Before Predef, she was coughing all the time, had difficulty breathing, and really wasn't sound enough just standing around idle. Now I can usually ride her at a walk a couple of times a week without any coughing and she can have the occasional run around her pasture.

I think that with the low dose she's on now, she should be okay. But I have seen changes in her...she has a longer hair coat which doesn't shed out, but that could also be the beginnings of Cushing's. She's lost a lot of muscle tone, but that could be old age/lack of exercise. I'm not knocking steroids, but I know that some people jump to them right away because they are so effective. But do try other avenues if possible.

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amc2
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From:Own a Legend. Ride a Friesian
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posted July 23, 2008 08:29 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for amc2     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
sometimes steriods may be needed but I would avoid them unless you have no other choice.

try removing the horse completely from hay - (including wet hay) and substitute purina high fat high fibre chunks as a complete feed replacement. (your feed store can tell you how much they need)
keep your horse on turnout if possible 24x7 and if you cant then dont use straw and use only a tiny bit of shavings-

feed herbs for horses special respiration mixed with the feed- it is a fine powder on purpose the desired effect is that they also breathe it in appareently.

you may find that the horse is no longer "heavey".
We had a pony like this a few years back0 it turned out to really be a hay allergy- never had a problem again...

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glitterless
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posted July 23, 2008 11:42 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for glitterless     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
amc, don't you worry about the risk of colic or ulcers when eliminating hay completely? I think I'd look into feeding haylage (and vaccinating for botulism) before taking a horse off of hay for heaves.

Soaked hay -- and I mean soaking wet, no dust -- should be sufficient. If it's not, the horse is probably not coughing from the hay.

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perpetual_novice
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posted July 24, 2008 11:37 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for perpetual_novice     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I understand about the dangers of steroids. I am not advocating them as the first treatment to use (nor did I do so in previous post).

Someone at the barn reminded me of the side effects saying, "You know steroids have serious long term effects, right?"

My answer was, "My horse doesn't have a long term."

If you have exhausted other treatment options or if less intrusive methods are no longer working and the symptoms of the original disease are worse than the side effects of the drug, steroids may be your only choice. If the drug allows the horse a reasonable quality of life, in the case of a horse with COPD allowing the horse to breathe more freely, in my horse's case a life without a persistently swollen ulcerated leg which would eventually lead to complete systemic infection and the failure of his lymphatic system, I believe it's a reasonable choice.

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pip
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From:Quebec
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posted August 03, 2008 09:42 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for pip     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I used Kenelog with some success, but when we moved to a new area, my new vet suggested trying something else to give him a break from the steroids. We used the QVAR inhaler with great success this winter. I have had to give him some powdered DEX this summer during any real hot, humid stretches, but other wise he is doing ok. He has had heaves for the last 10 years, but he just turned 29,so I guess we are handling it. I also make sure all his hay is soaked, and dust free. I try to keep him out as much as possible, but overnight stresses him out, so he has a big window in his stall that stays open all summer, and a fan in his stall and his run-in.
I have also used Airwaves, but found I didn't need it once we started on the inhaler.

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amc2
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posted August 05, 2008 08:02 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for amc2     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by glitterless:
amc, don't you worry about the risk of colic or ulcers when eliminating hay completely? I think I'd look into feeding haylage (and vaccinating for botulism) before taking a horse off of hay for heaves.

Soaked hay -- and I mean soaking wet, no dust -- should be sufficient. If it's not, the horse is probably not coughing from the hay.



careful of haylege- there is a serious risk of increased illness due to dead animals being caught up in the haying process and being stored in the wet hay bags

as long as you use a complete feed under vet supervision it is safe...

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glitterless
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posted August 06, 2008 12:21 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for glitterless     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I don't think that a complete feed is natural or a reasonable substitute unless all other options have been exhausted. I definitely agree with asking your vet for guidance, but I think a diet consisting of mostly roughage in the form of hay or pasture is healthier for all horses.

Wouldn't the illness you're speaking of be botulism?

[This message has been edited by glitterless (edited August 06, 2008).]

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horsehobby
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From:Wellandport Ont Canada
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posted August 12, 2008 10:12 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for horsehobby     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
hoby
quote:
Originally posted by glitterless:
I totally agree with you, but do some reading on the long term side effects of prednisolone (one of the common corticosteroids used to treat COPD) and you may change your mind. We had a discussion on EMG before about corticosteroid use and some posters had actually used prednisone themselves and had horrible side effects. Different animals react to medication differently. Some of them are fine, but some of them have serious complications, like a compromised immune system which can lead to premature death. Corticosteroids can also cause laminitis at high doses.

My mare is on Predef 2X and has been for a few years. At first she was getting a shot every couple of days, but with better management, we've got her down to 1 shot per week in the spring/summer/fall and no shots at all over the winter. She's older (early-mid 20s) and has other soundness issues, so we're just worried about keeping her pasture sound at this point, and so far so good. Before Predef, she was coughing all the time, had difficulty breathing, and really wasn't sound enough just standing around idle. Now I can usually ride her at a walk a couple of times a week without any coughing and she can have the occasional run around her pasture.

I think that with the low dose she's on now, she should be okay. But I have seen changes in her...she has a longer hair coat which doesn't shed out, but that could also be the beginnings of Cushing's. She's lost a lot of muscle tone, but that could be old age/lack of exercise. I'm not knocking steroids, but I know that some people jump to them right away because they are so effective. But do try other avenues if possible.


I wuld like to talk to you about the Predef X. My vet says in emergencies to give 20 CC once then the next day 10 CC and no more. How much was your horse getting daily or every other day and there were no comlications/side effects.

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glitterless
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posted August 12, 2008 11:47 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for glitterless     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
We always give her 10 cc. Are you talking about an emergency respiratory problem or giving Predef for a musculoskeletal injury? We've done that before too for the inflammation.

We've (thankfully) never had to deal with a real emergency in regards to her breathing yet. I know some horses have attacks where their respirations are really high and/or they are coughing horribly, but she hasn't been that bad yet. Maybe most horses or horses only in the beginning stages of COPD are fine after that big dose and then the one 10 cc dose and they simply don't require any more. How does your horse do after that treatment?

I don't think you'd see any side effects unless it was something immediate like a reaction to the drug or if the drug induced laminitis. If you had a high risk laminitis horse, 20 cc might be too much of a shock to their system. I don't know.

We did accidentally overdose her. My mom and I each vaccinated the poor girl with her 10 cc dose in the same day. She was fine, but probably peeved that we jabbed her twice in a day!

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elequine
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From:Southwestern Ontario Canada
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posted August 13, 2008 03:57 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for elequine     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
If the choice is between my horse not being able to breathe properly or using steriods --- hmmm.. I think I would want him to breathe and use the steroids.

In moderate to severe cases, steroid use may have to be the first course of action to initially reduce the overall symptoms.

While its not ideal, the effects of not being able to breathe properly could be far more detrimental...

While I hate the idea of steroids and all that goes with it, I hate the idea of a horse struggling to breathe properly even more.

We all want what's best for them, however sometimes it seems that people view the drug side effects in higher regard than the disease side effects.

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*kieara*
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posted August 13, 2008 11:14 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for *kieara*     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Two horses came to the barn that i board at at different times with incredibly bad heaves. Very obviously struggling with their breathing. We kicked them outside 24/7. That was it. It solved the problem. One of them is about 20 and he still gets a little weezy in the spring, you notice it immediately when bringing him in the barn to tack up - hes not worked hard - but like someone else said even 15 mins in the barn and he starts to weeze. THe other one is 18. has been at this barn for 3 years now on outdoor board and hasnt had any problems since he arrived. It took about 3-5 days i belive for his breathing to improve. I'm not saying that all cases dont need to be medicated - but the easiest solution may just be to kick them outside - they are on round bales when there is no pasture and pasture in the summer and are both healthy and well.

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horsehobby
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From:Wellandport Ont Canada
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posted August 13, 2008 01:45 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for horsehobby     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by glitterless:
We always give her 10 cc. Are you talking about an emergency respiratory problem or giving Predef for a musculoskeletal injury? We've done that before too for the inflammation.

We've (thankfully) never had to deal with a real emergency in regards to her breathing yet. I know some horses have attacks where their respirations are really high and/or they are coughing horribly, but she hasn't been that bad yet. Maybe most horses or horses only in the beginning stages of COPD are fine after that big dose and then the one 10 cc dose and they simply don't require any more. How does your horse do after that treatment?

I don't think you'd see any side effects unless it was something immediate like a reaction to the drug or if the drug induced laminitis. If you had a high risk laminitis horse, 20 cc might be too much of a shock to their system. I don't know.

We did accidentally overdose her. My mom and I each vaccinated the poor girl with her 10 cc dose in the same day. She was fine, but probably peeved that we jabbed her twice in a day!


How often did she receive the shots? This guy has heaves real back. Has no coughing but struggles to breathe constantly. He is on an inhaler 2 X a day 4 puffs each time which seeems to do nothing. We were told to use the Predef X only in emergencies.

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GoldenJumper
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posted August 13, 2008 04:44 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for GoldenJumper     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Years ago my sister leased an 8 year old gelding with really bad COPD!! (He grew up in a barn with chickens!! BAD BAD BAD!!) It was SO unbelievably bad that even his face/neck would swell with a few wisps of hay, soaked or not!! We tried him on EVERYTHING on the market with no real sucess to his breathing/swelling.

So...we started him on hay stretch, beet pulp and alfalfa pellets 4 times a day (in addition to his normal feed). He also lived outside 24/7 Except if it was -30C or more and windy he would come in with his window open in his stall (with an old style feed bag over the window to prevent a really bad draft) He was bedded down on the pelleted bedding (only we didn't wet it down first). After making those changes, he NEVER had to use any meds and he went on to event, cattle pen, eq classes etc...with NO problems! ...On the way to shows (no matter how long of a drive it would be) there was NEVER hay in the trailer. (I always felt bad for the horse stuck with him...) We always requested a stall at the end of the barn when at shows and made sure we could keep the outside door open even at night...usually we had our own horses beside him, but even if we didn't...the horse in the stall beside him got their hay soaked to help make it easier on him...once people understood they were great!!

Good luck!! It is one of those things can you can never do a half job of...and expect your horse to be ok.

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glitterless
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posted August 14, 2008 12:37 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for glitterless     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by horsehobby:
How often did she receive the shots? This guy has heaves real back. Has no coughing but struggles to breathe constantly. He is on an inhaler 2 X a day 4 puffs each time which seeems to do nothing. We were told to use the Predef X only in emergencies.


Right now she gets 10 cc once a week (every 7 days). Last fall/winter we were able to wean her off completely. The dosage that she's getting right now isn't considered high by any means, so it's okay to just stop them cold turkey. But if your horse is getting Predef 2X more frequently, you should actually wean them off it by giving them shots further and further apart.

We do the same thing when we put her on it in the spring. You start off giving 10 cc the first day, 10 cc the 2nd day, then you start skipping days. If you start on a Sunday you would dose Sunday, Monday, Wednesday, Saturday, Wednesday, and so on so that their system can adjust.

I'm guessing that your vet doesn't think that your horse needs to be on Predef 2X indefinitely and that's why you were told only to use it in emergencies. I've done a lot of reading on Predef 2X and prednisolone since my mare went on it several years ago. I know of quite a few people who dose their horses more frequently than I do for COPD. The chances of long term effects debilitating your horse definitely increase if you're dosing them several times a week for a long period of time, but like other people said, you have to take a look at the benefits and the risks. If you're not ready for euthanasia and want your horse to be sound, giving a corticosteroid is, in my opinion a very reasonable option. Just know that there are risks and that some horses do develop laminitis or suffer long term effects like a compromised immune system.

How is your horse with the inhaler? That's one route we never went to because it didn't seem practical to us and so far, the shots are working. If he is still bad with the inhaler and you're looking for other options, I suggest getting a second opinion from a different vet. Unless you have a young horse who isn't a good candidate for steroids, I don't see why you wouldn't at least give it a shot to keep the horse comfortable. Good luck.

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Suesan
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posted August 14, 2008 11:30 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Suesan     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
We have a friend whose horse was started on steroids just a few days ago, and moved to another paddock, away from the round bale. He colicked - and had to have surgery. At first it looked as if he was going to be okay, but by the time morning came around it was decided that he had to have the surgery; and so far, so good.

She has stopped the steroids, although the vet insists that it can't be the cause - it certainly looks like it; since that's the only thing done that was different.

Steroids definitely don't have a great effect on humans, although they take care of the problem in the short run. 3 people in my immediate family have had prednisone at some time or another, and it's really a serious drug, not to be taken lightly at all. My daughter got violently sick after just taking one tablet -- and I knew of another girl who took pred. for a parasite in her eye -- and she developed diabetes, gained weight - changed her life completely.

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horsehobby
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From:Wellandport Ont Canada
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posted August 14, 2008 06:45 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for horsehobby     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by glitterless:
Right now she gets 10 cc once a week (every 7 days). Last fall/winter we were able to wean her off completely. The dosage that she's getting right now isn't considered high by any means, so it's okay to just stop them cold turkey. But if your horse is getting Predef 2X more frequently, you should actually wean them off it by giving them shots further and further apart.

We do the same thing when we put her on it in the spring. You start off giving 10 cc the first day, 10 cc the 2nd day, then you start skipping days. If you start on a Sunday you would dose Sunday, Monday, Wednesday, Saturday, Wednesday, and so on so that their system can adjust.

I'm guessing that your vet doesn't think that your horse needs to be on Predef 2X indefinitely and that's why you were told only to use it in emergencies. I've done a lot of reading on Predef 2X and prednisolone since my mare went on it several years ago. I know of quite a few people who dose their horses more frequently than I do for COPD. The chances of long term effects debilitating your horse definitely increase if you're dosing them several times a week for a long period of time, but like other people said, you have to take a look at the benefits and the risks. If you're not ready for euthanasia and want your horse to be sound, giving a corticosteroid is, in my opinion a very reasonable option. Just know that there are risks and that some horses do develop laminitis or suffer long term effects like a compromised immune system.

How is your horse with the inhaler? That's one route we never went to because it didn't seem practical to us and so far, the shots are working. If he is still bad with the inhaler and you're looking for other options, I suggest getting a second opinion from a different vet. Unless you have a young horse who isn't a good candidate for steroids, I don't see why you wouldn't at least give it a shot to keep the horse comfortable. Good luck.


The vet has agreed to start with Predef 10CC everyother day. the horse has lost a lot of weight with no reserves. He wants to eat just can't seem to please him and he is not a big grass or hay eater. The inhaler I found really did not work although we continue to use it. He has been put on ulce meds as the added steriods will increase his chances of ulcers which I think he has and is one reason why he stopped eating. He still has that spark inhis eyes and loves his carrots and apples. If I can get the weight back on him we may have a fighting chance. So I am hoping that the Predef X will ease his breathing and make him more comportable. I can be reached at glennabenson@hotmail.com if you have anymore info for me. How long before you saw an improvement in yur mares breathing.

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horsehobby
Grand Prix Member

Posts: 52
From:Wellandport Ont Canada
Registered: Apr 2004

posted August 14, 2008 06:56 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for horsehobby     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by horsehobby:
The vet has agreed to start with Predef 10CC everyother day. the horse has lost a lot of weight with no reserves. He wants to eat just can't seem to please him and he is not a big grass or hay eater. The inhaler I found really did not work although we continue to use it. He has been put on ulce meds as the added steriods will increase his chances of ulcers which I think he has and is one reason why he stopped eating. He still has that spark inhis eyes and loves his carrots and apples. If I can get the weight back on him we may have a fighting chance. So I am hoping that the Predef X will ease his breathing and make him more comportable. I can be reached at glennabenson@hotmail.com if you have anymore info for me. How long before you saw an improvement in yur mares breathing. You can also email <ladyduke@cogeco.ca> as I will be away. Thanks for all you help


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